The delicate cut paper work of Maude White

Paper cut by Maude WhiteIf you have an interest in line and negative space you will find the delicate paper cuts of Maude White fascinating. Her beautifully rendered paper cuts rely on negative space and line.

In an interview over on Art Voice, Maude White says

“I have great respect for paper. I trust it. There is something very comforting and safe about cutting into the paper, discovering some story hidden inside.”

I could not help but think that Maude White must also trust in a steady hand, as one slip of the blade and would destroy the piece!

Paper cut by Maude WhiteI was once asked by a student why negative space is important. I wish I could have replied by pointing to Maude White’s exquisite paper cuts as her work demonstrates how negative spaces can be everything!

But  design principals or  technical concerns about paper cutting are not what drives Maude White, for in her artist statement she explains

“When I was a child I thought a great deal about hidden spaces. The intimacy, the hushed secrecy – I was always looking underneath objects, or through them. I have always believed that if you look hard enough, you will see something precious and new, or, perhaps, something incredibly ancient and sacred.

When I cut paper, I feel as if I am peeling back the outer, superficial layer of our vision to reveal the secret space beneath. With paper cutting there are so many opportunities to create negative space that tells its own story.”

Paper cut by Maude WhiteThe concept of revealing something, by what is not there rather rather than what is there made me savour the image and consider that moment of perception. Just wonderful!

For further information and to see more visit Maude White’s website or  Maude White’s Pinterest board  and over on Art Voice there is an interview where she discusses her work

 

EDM challenge drawing 132

I have been very remiss and not shared my drawings much lately. I am still drawing mundane everyday items as practice but not as often in January. Anyway here is everyday Matters drawing challenge 132 “draw a chain”. It sounds easy but is more of challenge than I thought it would be!

drawing of a chainI used watercolours, watercolour pencils, and pitt pens in a Strathmore  Mixed media sketchbook, which is nearly finished. There are a couple of pages left and it is full. It is the second I have filled this year.  I have decided to bind my own sketchbook and mix the type of papers in it so I have a variety of drawing surfaces. I have also decided to make it larger, I am not sure if this will be successful but I will find out as I use it.

If you are interested in this challenge here is  the EDM challenge list .

 

3D drawings in fiber and branches

Screen-S-BurgessIn an interview published on Jackson’s Art, Sarah Burgess explains that these installations composed of threads intertwined with branches explore life and loss.

Combining organic objects with man made items to create 3D drawings. Sarah Burgess explains “I tend to begin to develop an idea two dimensionally, sketching ideas and making notes, diagrams but then I need to come out of my sketchbook and work with wood, wire, thread, stitch – whatever seems appropriate – but I am still drawing really.”

Read the whole interview in “Sarah Burgess on pushing the boundaries of Drawing” By Lisa Takahashi on Jackson’s Art or visit Sarah Burgess’s website to view her portfolio its interesting stuff honest!

 

Drawing is good for mental health

sketch of art materials Science says drawing is good for mental health. Not only does it make you happier it is good for your brain. Print.com recently ran an article by Robin Landa. Draw Yourself Happy: Drawing, Creativity and Your Brain makes some very interesting points in favour of establishing a drawing practice.

Researchers have found that drawing not only effects the brain but also improves makes you happier. I think most people who draw know this but it very nice to have science back you up on this! So, instead of an art practice being a guilty self indulgence it becomes an activity that promotes good mental health!

Another confirmation of a personal belief, is when I talk about the muscle memory of drawing things like an elipse or a circle or even a straight line – I discovered I am not talking rubbish. Discoveries like this is always a relief and obviously just has to shared. (She says with a grin)

In another piece of research “Drawing on the right side of the brain: A voxel-based morphometry analysis of observational drawing” used voxel-based morphometry which is a scanning method, used in this case to study how observational drawing effected the brain. They worked with art students and non-art students and measured the volume and performance of grey and white brain matter while drawing. Guess what they discovered?

… drawing relates to changes in fine motor structures in art and non-art students. Also, the scans revealed that the art students had more grey matter in the precuneus in the parietal lobe, an area of the brain linked to a wide spectrum of integrated tasks, including creativity, visuo-spatial imagery and more.

So put simply (I think) is that when we draw we grow more grey matter in the area of the brain that is responsible for things like creativity. What this says to me is that practice really does lead to improvement because what is happening is that your brain is developing. So the mantra practice, practice, practice makes scientific sense.

Also when drawing dopamine is released but, as James E. Zull points out,

the dopamine is released in the newest region of cortex, the part that we use to create ideas, make decisions, and plan our actions. Thus, we feel rewarded when we create new objects or actions. And since creativity is based on the decisions made by the creator, the reward system kicks in when we are in control and inventing things that we have thought of ourselves.”

This  little nugget had me thinking, particularly the phrase “the reward system kicks in” I think it kicks in even stronger when others recognise the activity. The reward is enhanced in social situation which explains why various internet drawing challenges work so well. This is my hunch, but I am sure somewhere in the world researchers are looking at social learning and the internet. What do you think?

Anyway over cuppa do pop over and read Robin Landa’s Draw Yourself Happy: Drawing, Creativity and Your Brain

sketch of art materials About the images. These are a couple of recent sketches. I have decided that this blog needs a redesign so I am drawing art materials and working out ideas. These were done in a Strathmore mixed media sketchbook which is 5.5 in x 8.5 in (14 x 21.6 cm) using artist pitt pens, Derwent watercolour pencils and watercolour paint. Click on the thumbnails to be takes to larger versions.

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