Free online Drawing and Photography courses offered by Open2Study

Readers will be interested in this free course run by the Open2Study which is part of Open Universities Australia.
The Art of Drawing and Painting starts on 2 June 2014. I have heaps on my plate at the moment but I could not resist enrolling.

It looks like it covers fundamentals of colour theory, touches on perspective and the hands on is balanced with a touch of art history.

This is blurb from the Open2Study site where you can sign up (it’s free),  and the you tube promo

“Through discussions and visual demonstrations, you will learn how art has been expressed through history, the basics of colour theory, and how to draw and paint flat images and perspectives. Further, you will be able to understand the principles and styles of assimilating visual compositions. You will produce paintings and collages influenced by famous school of arts and painters such as Pointillism, Cubism, De Stijl, Surrealism, and Constructivism. This course is open to everyone who wants to try. It will provoke your sense of creativity and allow you to express yourself in a way that fits within your skill level.”

Also for those who carry a camera everywhere they go there is a free Photography course which is run out of RMIT University. It also starts tomorrow and Jerry has signed up for that one!

Once again this is the class description from the Open2Study site where you can sign up (it’s free) and the You Tube promo.

“You will learn about photography as a visual art practice, and how this can help you to become an engaging and active photographer. You will explore the work and concepts of contemporary photographic artists, which may trigger a new interest in what you photograph. In addition to this, you will also learn some of the practical skills required to further explore photography in exciting and creative ways. Finally, we look at the idea of a “digital darkroom” and explore ways that you can further your interest in photography through post-production knowledge and techniques.”

If you are interested in seeing what else is on offer in the Open2Study free courses visit this page 


An insight into Art Education

We paid a visit to the V&A yesterday. As Usual we walked away perfectly satisfied and stimulated.

One particular little side exhibit in the British Galleries illustrated aspects of a design education. In Britain from 1837 onwards the government established design schools in centres such as London, Glasgow, Manchester and Birmingham. Previously drawing schools had been run from private studios.

When the schools were established a curriculum was designed and teaching exercises developed which became known as the “South Kensington Method”. The exercises focussed on drawing ornamental shapes from models and examples including casts which can also be still seen in the Museum today.

Kate Greenaway tile design

This design won a scholarship prize for Kate Greenaway who became famous for her illustrations for children’s books. The National Competition provided funds for 15 students to study at the National Art Training School at South Kensington.

Diagram showing the harmonious relationships of colourThis “Diagram showing the harmonious relationships of colour” was used as a teaching aid in about 1853. The colour wheel aimed to illustrate what colours would go together. Today they look quite muted. It was accompanied by The Elementary Manual of Colour written by Richard Redgave who drew up the first curriculum of the National Schools of Art when they were established.

WS Singer's sketchbookThis is WS Singer’s sketchbook. He became a designer of church furnishings. The book shows tracings of drawings from the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Carl August Menzel panelThis panel is a print, by Carl August Menzel illustrating a series of classical patterns which was part of a set used by architects, interior designers and manufacturers. This print is mounted on card and was copied by students.

John Ruskin, did not like the South Kensington system as he believed this copying and tracing stifled imagination and he started The Ruskin School of Drawing in 1871.

Another little piece of Art Education history that you may want on your next trivia quiz night, the South Kensington School in London, became the Royal College of Art (RCA) in 1896. At the time is shared a site with the South Kensington Museum that became the Victoria and Albert Museum in 1899.